Fan Pictures by Kuniyoshi -Cats, Kabuki Actors and Girls

2024, June 1st-July 28th

1st Term June 1st-25th
2nd Term June 29th-July 28th

Will be closed on June 3, 10, 17, 24, 26-28, July 1, 8, 16, 22.

Opening Hours : 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Last Admission: 5:00 p.m.)
Admission : Adult ¥1000 / University and High school students ¥700 / Junior High School Students and below(under 15 years old) FREE

FLYER

Enjoy the fan ukiyo-e prints and feel the breeze!

Uchiwa is a traditional Japanese hand fan, typically crafted with a round or oval bamboo frame and adorned with paper. During the Edo period, these fans were indispensable not only for cooling off during the hot summer months but also served as fashionable accessories and collectibles for kabuki enthusiasts, similar to modern bromides. Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797-1861), a ukiyo-e artist renowned for his wide range of subjects of the late Edo period (1603-1868), was prolific in fan picture production. His work, which encompassed more than 600 pieces, features humorous caricatures, vivid portrayals of kabuki actors, and lively depictions of beautiful women, making these fans beloved daily necessities in Edo.

While fans are typically consumable items, surviving examples are rare; however, those showcased in this exhibition are in exceptional condition. Among the 220 pieces displayed, approximately 100 works are being unveiled for the first time. We hope you will enjoy the delightful, intriguing, and lesser-known world of Kuniyoshi’s fan pictures.

Girl Playing with a Cat (1st term)

The world’s exclusive exhibition of Kuniyoshi’s fan pictures

Fans were used as practical products until they became dirty or broken. However, all the pieces showcased are in excellent condition, highlighting exceptional carving and printing techniques. This presents a unique opportunity to explore Kuniyoshi’s artistic allure through fan pictures that have remained in good condition—a rarity in itself.

Shadow Pictures: Cats Forming a Japanese Lion Mask, a Horned Owl and a Female Demon’s Mask (1st term)
Shadow Pictures: Cats Forming a Japanese Lion Mask, a Horned Owl and a Female Demon’s Mask (1st term)
Cats Juggling Balls (2nd term)

100 premiere works

Among the exhibits, 100 works are being displayed for the first time, including renowned pieces such as “Girl Playing with a Cat” and “Cats Juggling Balls.” This collection not only encompasses depictions of actors and beautiful women but also includes store advertisements and puzzle-solving games, providing insights into the daily lives and entertainment of the Edo period. Additionally, it showcases Kuniyoshi’s meticulous drawing skills.

Birds’ Peddlers (2nd term)
Benkei on the Boat (2nd term)
Stacked Box and Scarlet Carpet (1st term)

Featured themes: yakusha-e and bijin-ga

Kuniyoshi, renowned for his humorous caricatures and dynamic warrior depictions, frequently centered his fan art on yakusha-e (portraits of kabuki actors) and bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women). These subjects, deeply ingrained in the daily lives of Edo people, highlight lively and exquisitely rendered figures, particularly women. Attendees are encouraged to appreciate the beloved Kuniyoshi beauties, cherished by spectators of the Edo-era.

Evening Snow at Yushima (2nd term)
Evening Cool (1st term)
Spring Rainbow (2nd term)

Origin of Oshikatsu [supporting activities of one’s favorite]

Fans have historically played a crucial role in Japanese culture, dating back to the Edo period when fan pictures featuring popular kabuki actors were highly coveted. These fans allowed people to feel a daily connection with their favorite performers, much like today’s Oshikatsu, where fans support their favorite celebrities by inscribing names or messages.

Kabuki Actors Segawa Michinosuke and Sawamura Tosshō (1st term)

協力:ギャラリー紅屋

Admission
Adult 1000 yen
University and High school students 700 yen
Junior High School Students and below (under 15 years old) Free
Calendar

CLOSED

2024 6

休館日

3,10,17,24,26-28

2024 / 6

3,10,17,24,26-28

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
2024 7

休館日

1,8,16,22,29-31

2024 / 7

1,8,16,22,29-31

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi “One Hundred Views of the Moon”

2024, April 3rd-May 26th

1st Term April 3rd-29th
2nd Term May 3rd-26th

Will be closed on April 8, 15, 22, 30, May 1, 2, 7, 13, 20.

Opening Hours : 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Last Admission: 5:00 p.m.)
Admission : Adult ¥1000 / University and High school students ¥700 / Junior High School Students and below(under 15 years old) FREE

FLYER
LIST

Exhibition of the complete 100 works of “One Hundred Views of the Moon”: Tsukioka Yoshitoshi’s most well-known works

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839-1892) was an ukiyo-e artist who was active from the end of the Edo period to the early Meiji period. Yoshitoshi’s “musha-e (warrior pictures)” are famous for their powerful and bold compositions, and are full of a cool charm that attracts us even today. The Ota Memorial Museum of Art also often features Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, but this exhibition will introduce all 100 pieces of “One Hundred Views of the Moon” which is his masterpiece from his later years, and the exhibition period will be divided into the first and second halves.

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi “One Hundred Views of the Moon: Lady Yūgao from “The Tale of Genji”” (1st term)
Tsukioka Yoshitoshi “One Hundred Views of the Moon: Moon Above the Daimotsu Bay: Benkei” (2nd term)
Tsukioka Yoshitoshi “One Hundred Views of the Moon: Jade Rabbit and Sun Wukong” (1st term)

Appreciating “One Hundred Views of the Moon” from various aspects

The themes of “One Hundred Views of the Moon” are based on stories related to the moon. They vary widely, from warriors and beautiful women in the Heian period and the Age of Civil Wars, to mystic creatures such as ghosts and monsters. In this exhibition, we will introduce a clearer view of the world of “One Hundred Views of the Moon” through the subjects depicted in the pictures such as Japanese poems, warriors and the everyday lives of the people.

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi “One Hundred Views of the Moon: “How hopeless it is, it would be better for me to sink beneath the waves perhaps then I could see my man from moon capital” -Poem by Ariko”
Tsukioka Yoshitoshi “One Hundred Views of the Moon: Cry of the Fox” (2nd term)
Tsukioka Yoshitoshi “One Hundred Views of the Moon: Midnight Moon at Mt. Yoshino: Iga-no tsubone” (1st term)

“Flowers” and “Snow” by Yoshitoshi’s pupils

Akiyama Buemon, the publisher of “One Hundred Views of the Moon,” also published a set works by Yoshitoshi’s pupils, Mizuno Toshikata and Arai Yoshimune. Toshikata’s “Thirty-six Selected Beauties,” features beautiful women reminiscent of flowers, while Yoshimune’s “Selected Tales of Snow” is based on the old stories related to snow. In Japan, the moon is often presented in combination with flowers and snow. This exhibition introduces not only Yoshitoshi’s moon, but also flowers and snow pictures by his pupils.

Mizuno Toshikata “Thirty-six Selected Beauties: After the Bath, Woman of the Kansei Era” (1st term)
Arai Yoshimune “Selected Tales of Snow: Satō Tadanobu Fighting in the Snow” (2nd term)
Admission
Adult 1000 yen
University and High school students 700 yen
Junior High School Students and below (under 15 years old) Free
Calendar

CLOSED

2024 4

休館日

1,2,8,15,22,30

2024 / 4

1,2,8,15,22,30

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
2024 5

休館日

1,2,7,13,20,27-31

2024 / 5

1,2,7,13,20,27-31

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

Introduction to Ukiyo-e

Will be closed on December 4, 11, 18.

Opening Hours : 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Last Admission: 5:00 p.m.)
Admission : Adult ¥800 / University and High school students ¥600 / Junior High School Students and below(under 15 years old) FREE

FLYER
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When viewing ukiyo-e, which point do you focus on?

Since most ukiyo-e are woodblock prints, it is important to appreciate not only the artist’s brush strokes, but also the excellent techniques of the carvers and printers who create the ukiyo-e together with the artists, so as to enjoy the works more deeply. There are also a number of key points, such as the state of preservation of the works and the texts inscribed in the pictures, that reveal the behind-the-scenes production process.

This exhibition introduces diverse perspectives from which to view ukiyo-e, from basic knowledge to in-depth analysis for ukiyo-e connoisseurs. We hope you will experience various ways to enjoy ukiyo-e.

Utagawa Hiroshige “One Hundred Famous Views of Edo: Sudden Shower over Shin-ōhashi Bridge and Atake”

Dig deep into the “Great Wave” by Katsushika Hokusai

Katsushika Hokusai’s Thirty-six Views of Mt. Fuji: The Great Wave off Kanagawa is the most famous ukiyo-e in the world. This work is filled with highlights for viewing ukiyo-e, such as Hokusai’s observational skills in capturing the furious waves, the techniques of the carver and the printer, and the use of an imported blue pigment. In this exhibition, we explore the techniques of masterpieces by leading artists such as Hokusai, Hiroshige and Utamaro.

Katsushika Hokusai “Thirty-six Views of Mt. Fuji: The Great Wave off Kanagawa”

Do you have an eye for ukiyo-e? Discover the differences of printing techniques!

Since most of ukiyo-e are woodblock prints, there are many identical works in circulation. However, when we compare earlier and later prints, we find that there are various differences in color, shape, and other details in the same work. In this exhibition, we also look at the details of the printing process and technique.

Utagawa Hiroshige “Sixty-nine Stations of the Kisokaidō Road: No. 40, Suhara”
※Lines and colors vary from edition to edition.
Utagawa Hiroshige “Sixty-nine Stations of the Kisokaidō Road: No. 40, Suhara”
Utagawa Hiroshige “One Hundred Famous Views of Edo: Inside Kameido Tenjin Shrine”
※The color of the sky under the bridge is changed.
Utagawa Hiroshige “One Hundred Famous Views of Edo: Inside Kameido Tenjin Shrine”

Delve into eye-opening knowledge of ukiyo-e

A small margin in the corner, and mysterious symbols in prints. In these small places that we normally do not notice, there are hidden clues that reveal the background of ukiyo-e, from productions to its state of preservation. Let’s examine some of the interesting knowledge about ukiyo-e that will prove eye-opening even for seasoned ukiyo-e lovers.

Toyohara Kunichika “Kunichika Manga of Flowers of Tokyo: No.4 Kabuki Actor Nakamura Shikan as Tamiya Iemon”
※ small margin which shows the mark for printing
Utagawa Toyokuni “Woman without Makeup like Mt.Fuji without Snow in Summer”
※The mark inherited by the artists of the Utagawa School
Kitagawa Utamaro “Courtesan Shiratama of the Wakana-ya House”
※The sign of the publisher Tsutaya Jzaburō
Kitagawa Utamaro “Seven Beauties in the Yoshiwara: Courtesan Shiratsuyu of the Wakana-ya House”
Admission
Adult 1000 yen
University and High school students 700 yen
Junior High School Students and below (under 15 years old) Free
Calendar

CLOSE

2023 12

休館日

4,11,18,25-31

2023 / 12

4,11,18,25-31

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

Katsushika Oi 「Night Scene in the Yoshiwara」 -Charm of Hand Paintings

Will be closed on November 6, 13, 20.

Opening Hours : 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Last Admission: 5:00 p.m.)
Admission : Adult ¥800 / University and High school students ¥600 / Junior High School Students and below(under 15 years old) FREE

FLYER
LIST



Katsushika Ōi (date of birth and death unknown), an ukiyo-e artist in the Edo period, was the daughter of Katsushika Hokusai. Although only about 10 of her works have been confirmed to exist in the world, they are impressive and different from her great father’s works, continuing to fascinate many people. Among them, “Night Scene in the Yoshiwara” could be one of her best-known hand-drawn paintings, capturing the light and darkness of the Yoshiwara pleasure quarters. In this exhibition, we exhibit a number of original hand-drawn paintings from Ota Memorial Museum of Art’s collection as well as “Night Scene in the Yoshiwara” for the first time in three and a half years. Ukiyo-e prints were produced with the cooperation of a publisher, painter, carver, and a printer, and printed in large numbers. However, ukiyo-e hand-drawn paintings are one-of-a-kind works drawn directly on paper or silk by the artist. Our collection of hand-drawn paintings covers the long history of ukiyo-e and its wide range of genres, from Hishikawa Moronobu to Kitagawa Utamaro, Katsushika Hokusai, and Kobayashi Kiyochika of the Meiji era. Along with Ōi’s work, visitors can enjoy the world of hand-painted works by various artists.

Katsushika Ōi “Night Scene in the Yoshiwara”

1 “Night Scene in the Yoshiwara” on display for the first time in three and a half years

“Night Scene in the Yoshiwara” will be on display for the first time in three and a half years, and is recognized as one of the best-known hand-drawn paintings among Katsushika Ōi’s rare works. This is a masterpiece depicted using light and shadows, where she dramatically portrayed the night in Yoshiwara, the pleasure quarters of Edo. As a number of light sources are depicted in the painting, including the lanterns held by the customers and the lights inside the brothel, the figures of the people illuminated by the light emerge in the dark creating a dreamlike atmosphere. Please enjoy the brilliant brushwork by Ōi, including the beautiful colors and gradation.

2 Hokusai, Utamaro and Kiyochika – discovering the real brushwork of artists

In ukiyo-e, woodblock prints were produced in collaboration with artists, carvers, and printers, and it was possible to produce many prints. Therefore, ukiyo-e prints with the same titles are often stored in museums all around the world. On the other hand, hand-drawn paintings are valuable as they are one-of-a-kind originals that artists such as Hokusai, Utamaro and Kiyochika painted directly on paper or silk. We can see the real brushwork by artists in hand-drawn paintings, with the fine lines and beautiful color gradations. The beauty of the richly used pigments is also one of the highlights of this exhibition.

Katsushika Hokusai “Buddha’s Disciple, Rakan”
Kitagawa Utamaro “Courtesan Reading a Letter”
Utagawa Kuniyoshi/Utagawa Kunihide “Woman after Bathing”
Kobayashi Kiyochika “Ryōgoku-bashi Bridge in Civilized Tokyo”

3 People, landscapes, and stories – discovering works on various themes

One of the most depicted motifs in hand-drawn paintings is the so-called bijin-ga painting portraying a standing woman. However, The Ota Memorial Museum of Art’s collection of hand-drawn paintings includes many artists and genres, and you can find works on a wide range of themes, not just the bijin-ga paintings. This exhibition will be introducing the works divided into four themes, which are “people”, “common life”, “landscapes”, and “stories”. We will present the charm of hand-drawn paintings from various perspectives such as the changes in women’s customs, famous places all over Japan, and stories familiar to Edo people.

Kuwagata Keisai “Party under Cherry Blossoms”
Tsukioka Yoshitoshi “Lady Tokiwa and Her Children Wandering in the Snow”
Utagawa Hiroshige “Three Waterfalls in Nikkō: Kegon Falls (R) / Kirifuri Falls (Mid) / Urami Falls (L)”
Katsushika Taito Ⅱ “Empress Jingū and Her Son, Emperor Ōjin in Babyhood”
Kaigetsudō Ando “Picture Scroll of the Ogre Inhabiting Mt. Ōe”
Admission
Adult 1000 yen
University and High school students 700 yen
Junior High School Students and below (under 15 years old) Free
Calendar

CLOSED

2023 11

休館日

6,13,20,27-30

2023 / 11

6,13,20,27-30

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
プレスの方へ

本展のプレスリリースのダウンロード、掲載や取材のお申込みはこちらから。

Beautiful Women and Kimono

2023, September 1st-October 22nd

1st Term September 1st-24th
2nd Term September 30th-October 22nd

Will be closed on August 4, 11, 19, 25-29、October 2, 10, 16.

Opening Hours : 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Last Admission: 5:00 p.m.)
Admission : Adult ¥800 / University and High school students ¥600 / Junior High School Students and below(under 15 years old) FREE

FLYER
LIST

Ukiyo-e are paintings that capture the trends of the time, and an important genre within ukiyo-e are “bijin-ga”, which portray beautiful women in the latest fashions. The appearance of the kimono depicted in ukiyo-e represents the aesthetic sense back then, and also determines the impression created by the work. The Edo period, when ukiyo-e flourished, was an era when social stability and industrial development in various regions grew and fashion culture blossomed.

While various clothing, accessories, techniques, and designs were developed, ukiyo-e artists depicted these attractive items in their paintings, and as a result, excellent bijin-ga which captured the trends of the time were produced.

In this exhibition, we will introduce about 130 works from the early Edo period to the early Showa period. The changing fashions and styles of kimono over time and auspicious patterns and designs that had been beloved since ancient times as well as the history of bijin-ga will be presented. You will be able to feel the richness of Japanese culture from the portraits of women wearing patterns which each have their own history and story.

Utagawa Toyoharu “Procession of a Courtesan and Her Attendants under Cherry Blossoms” 【2nd term】

Yōshū Chikanobu “True Beauties: No.14 Schoolgirl” 【1st term】

A Lot of Excellent Works of Bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women) 

This exhibition introduces ukiyo-e paintings and prints that depict beautiful women spanning approximately 250 years, and features a large number of outstanding works by leading artists of the time, such as Suzuki Harunobu, Kitagawa Utamaro and Tsukioka Yoshitoshi. Many beautiful and precious masterpieces are a must-see. Please do not miss them.

Suzuki Harunobu “Tea House Girl Ofude of the Hayashi-ya House” 【1st term】
Kitagawa Utamaro “Physiognomic Types of Women: Woman Reading a Letter” 【2nd term】

Wearing Patterns and Stories

Kimonos have many kinds of different patterns. Even if the motif appears simple, the patterns sometimes represent an auspicious meaning, sometimes are based on classic tales such as “The Tales of Genji” or “The Tales of Ise”, and sometimes associated with popular kabuki actors. This exhibition also delves into the meanings of the patterns, and introduces how the women depicted in ukiyo-e enjoyed not only the beauty of the patterns, but also the stories behind them.

Hishikawa Moronobu “Courtesan and Her Attendant Strolling” 【1st term】
Keisai Eisen “Eight Fans and Geisha: Scattered Shower at Tomigaoka” 【2nd term】

Men in Fashion

Men in the Edo period were as passionate about dressing as they are today. Ukiyo-e often depicted men’s preferences for fashion items such as unique coordinates of a dark-colored kimono and a red sash called “Harakiri (belly-breaking) belt,” and imported leather tobacco pouches with gold patterns. In this exhibition, you can enjoy highly individual men’s fashions such as beautifully dressed boys, sophisticated men, and chivalrous men in wild yukatas.

Torii Kiyonaga “Fashionable Beauties of the Pleasure Quarters: Nakazu” 【1st term】
Tsukioka Yoshitoshi “One Hundred Views of the Moon: Moon through Conflagration” 【2nd term】

Enjoy Dressing – Sophisticated, Gorgeous and Cute!

People in the Edo period wore distinct clothing depending on their status, age, and occupation. Ukiyo-e also depicts the different charms of each kind of fashion style: high-ranking courtesans wearing elaborate kimonos with gorgeous hair ornaments, towns girls coordinated in their kimono with floral patterns and bright colors, and geisha using stylish accessories such as hairpins and half collars. It may be fun to learn the techniques of how to dress from their styles

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi “One Hundred Views of the Moon: Moon through Conflagration” 【2nd term】
Utagawa Kunisada “One Day of Contemporary Women: Hours of “the Sheep” (around 2 p.m.)”
Hashiguchi Goyō “Woman Holding a Lipstick Brush” 【2nd term】
Admission
Adult 800 yen
University and High school students 600 yen
Junior High School Students and below (under 15 years old) Free
Calendar

CLOSED

2023 9

休館日

4,11,19,25-29

2023 / 9

4,11,19,25-29

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
2023 10

休館日

2,10,16,23-31

2023 / 10

2,10,16,23-31

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

Utagawa Hiroshige -Traveling Mountains and Seas

2023, August 1st-27th 

Will be closed on August 7, 14, 21.

Opening Hours : 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Last Admission: 5:00 p.m.)
Admission : Adult ¥800 / University and High school students ¥600 / Junior High School Students and below FREE

FLYER
LIST

Exploring Breathtaking Scenery in Japan with Hiroshige

As a leading painter of landscapes, the ukiyo-e artist Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858) gained popularity among the general public at the end of the Edo period. As well as the famous landmarks in Edo, Hiroshige was also active in depicting natural scenes of mountains and the sea in various places. He had focused on famous places along the Tōkaidō Road which is far from Edo since his youth, but from around his 40s especially, it is known that he traveled to various places such as Kōshū and Bōsō; it is thought that since then his experience of capturing nature while travelling is reflected in his works.

Mountains and the sea are the key themes, and this exhibition will show a wide variety of works, from well-known masterpieces to the works rarely exhibited, including all of the 20 drawings in the series “Wrestling Match Between the Mountains and Sea ” which Hiroshige produced in his later years, “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji“ and “Famous Views of the Sixty-odd Provinces”.

This exhibition will also introduce the process of producing these works as well as the famous places that Hiroshige actually visited, and the places he depicted based on the illustrations from existing geography books. We will also discover through these works the various forms of religious beliefs rooted in the mountains and the sea of each place, such as shrines built on the steep mountains and the large torii gates on the sea. This exhibition offers visitors the opportunity to learn more about Hiroshige’s works while enjoying the breathtaking scenery depicted in his ukiyo-e paintings, just as if they were traveling.

1 All 20 works of ” Wrestling Match Between the Mountains and Sea”, one of the Hiroshige’s masterpieces that depicts the beauty of Japan’s mountains and seas, will be exhibited

In his later years, Utagawa Hiroshige produced a number of works featuring landscapes of various provinces in Japan, especially mountains and seas. Among them, the series ” Wrestling Match Between the Mountains and Sea” is one of his best-known series and he completed publishing it just before his death from cholera in September 1858. This exhibition features all 20 works of this series into which Hiroshige poured his last energy, as well as “One Hundred Famous Views of Edo” and ” Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji”, which he painted in his later years. This is also the first experience of presenting the entire series in one exhibition. In addition, ” Famous Views of the Sixty-odd Provinces ” and many other landscapes pictures by Hiroshige will be introduced.

Utagawa Hiroshige “Comparison of Mountains and Seas: Tateyama in Ecchū Province”
Utagawa Hiroshige “Whirlpool at Naruto in Awa Province”
Utagawa Hiroshige “Thirty-six Views of Mt. Fuji: Inume Pass in Kai Province”
Utagawa Hiroshige “Famous Sights of the Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō Road: No.14 Hara, View of Mt. Fuji and Mt. Ashitaka”
Utagawa Hiroshige “Thirty-six Views of Mt. Fuji: Sea off Satta in Suruga Province”

2 Did Hiroshige see the actual scenery? – Thinking about the process of creation

Hiroshige traveled around various provinces during his lifetime. In his travels to Kōshū and Bōsō Province, he kept a diary and sketches, and his works after returning to Edo are believed to be based on his experiences during the travel. On the other hand, Hiroshige often referred to illustrations in existing geographical books such as Fuchigami Kyokkō’s “Noted Landscapes” and Tani Bunchō’s “The Book of Famous Mountains”.  In this exhibition, we will study Hiroshige’s ingenuity to create beautiful landscape prints through his works and materials.

Utagawa Hiroshige “Comparison of Mountains and Seas: Mt.Zōzu in Sanuki Province”
Utagawa Hiroshige “Saru-hashi Bridge in Kai Province”

3 Introducing various beliefs rooted in great nature

In Hiroshige’s landscape pictures, we can often find the precincts of shrines and temples. Great nature such as steep mountains and capes often became objects of worship since ancient times. This exhibition introduces various beliefs of the Edo period, including the Fuji and Oyama faiths, through Hiroshige’s works.

Utagawa Hiroshige “Comparison of Mountains and Seas: Ōyama in Sagami Province”
Utagawa Hiroshige “Famous Places in the Sixty-odd Provinces: Kōzuke Province, Mt. Haruna in the Snow”

Admission
Adult 800 yen
University and High school students 600 yen
Junior High School Students and below Free
Calendar

CLOSED

2023 08

休館日

7,14,21,28-31

2023 / 08

7,14,21,28-31

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

Woodblock Prints Exhibition of Paul Jacoulet

2023, June 3rd-28th-July 26th

1st Term June 3rd-28th
2nd Term July 1st-26th

Will be closed on June 5, 12, 19, 26, 29, 30, July 3, 10, 18, 24.

Opening Hours : 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Last Admission: 5:00 p.m.)
Admission : Adult ¥1000 / University and High school students ¥700 / Junior High School Students and below

FLYER
LIST

aul Jacoulet (1896-1960) was a French artist born in Paris. Since his father started to teach French in Japan, he moved to Japan at the age of 3 and remained there until his death at 64. At 38, in 1934, he published a distinctive series of woodblock prints depicting people in the South Seas Islands and Asia. During the early Showa era (1926-1989), a popular genre of collaborative woodblock prints called “shin-hanga” emerged, involving painters, carvers, and printers. Jacoulet’s vividly colored woodblock prints, portraying individuals of all ages from various countries, stand out as unique examples within the new prints of that time. This exhibition showcases the complete range of Jacoulet’s new prints.

“Tattooed Woman of Falalap, West Carolines” (Personal Collection) ©ADAGP, Paris & JASPAR, Tokyo, 2023 E5060【2nd term】

“The Confidant (from the Machurian Princesses Series)” (Personal Collection) ©ADAGP, Paris & JASPAR, Tokyo, 2023 E5060【1st term】
The Pearls, Manchukuo” (Personal Collection) 【1st term】

“The Nautilus Shell, Yap” (Personal Collection) 【2nd term】
本展の見どころ

First-Ever Exhibition of All 162 Prints by Jacoulet in Tokyo

This exhibition will showcase a comprehensive collection of 162 prints by Jacoulet, divided into two separate terms. It marks the first occasion for all 162 works to be presented together in Tokyo.

“Portrait of a Chamorro Woman―Green(from the Rainbow Series)” (Personal Collection) ©ADAGP, Paris & JASPAR, Tokyo, 2023 E5060【1st term】
“The North Wind, Korea” (Personal Collection)【2nd term】

Vibrantly Colored Portrayals of People from the South Seas Islands and Asia

Jacoulet’s colorful prints vividly depict individuals from Micronesia’s Saipan and Yap islands, as well as various regions in Asia, including Japan, the Ainu, Korea, China, and Manchuria. His artworks showcase a harmonious blend of vibrant colors, such as red, light blue, yellow, and purple, and offers a refreshing surprise to those accustomed to the digital color palettes today.

“The Favorite (from the Machurian Princesses Series)” (Personal Collection) ©ADAGP, Paris & JASPAR, Tokyo, 2023 E5060【2nd term】
“The Yellow-Eyed Boys, Ohlol, East Carolines” (Personal Collection) ©ADAGP, Paris & JASPAR, Tokyo, 2023 E50【1st term】

Jacoulet’s Prints Stand Out in the World of “Shin-hanga”

The term “shin-hanga” refers to woodblock prints created during the Taishō and Shōwa Eras through collaborative efforts of artists, carvers, and printers. While publishers typically played a leading role in ukiyo-e print production, Jacoulet took charge of directing the carvers and printers himself, pursuing his own unique artistic style. His works gained recognition after World War II, with positive reception from General MacArthur and other American military personnel stationed in Japan. Additionally, Jacoulet carved his own path in terms of distribution, setting himself apart from other shin-hanga artists.

“The Mysterious Pacific, South Seas” (Personal Collection) 【1st term】
“The Betel Nut Boy, Yap” (Personal Collection) ©ADAGP, Paris & JASPAR, Tokyo, 2023 E5060【2nd term】

Jacoulet’s Place in the Lineage of Ukiyo-e during the Edo Period

Having grown up in Japan, Jacoulet was intimately familiar with traditional Japanese culture, including ukiyo-e, kabuki plays, and gidayū ballad dramas. From a young age, he collected and reproduced ukiyo-e prints, immersing himself in their artistry. During his teenage years, he studied Japanese painting under Ikeda Terukata and his wife Shōen, who were students of Tsukioka Yoshitoshi’s original pupil. Inspired by the works of Kitagawa Utamaro, Jacoulet specialized in depicting beautiful women. It can be said that Jacoulet was a part of the lineage of ukiyo-e artists during the Edo period.

“The Geisha Kiyoka, Tokyo” (Personal Collection) ©ADAGP, Paris & JASPAR, Tokyo, 2023 E5060 【1st term】
“After the Rain, Tarang, Yap” (Personal Collection)©ADAGP, Paris & JASPAR, Tokyo, 2023 E5060【1st term】
Admission
Adult 1000 yen
University and High school students 700 yen
Junior High School Students and below Free
開館日カレンダー

CLOSED

2023 6

休館日

1,2,5,12,19,26,29,30

2023 / 6

1,2,5,12,19,26,29,30

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
2023 7

休館日

3,10,18,24,27-31

2023 / 7

3,10,18,24,27-31

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

Cats in Ukiyo-e

2023, April 1st-May 28th

1st Term April 1st-25th
2nd Term April 29th-May 28th

Will be closed on April 3, 10, 17, 24, 26-28, May 1, 8, 15, 22.

Opening Hours : 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Last Admission: 5:00 p.m.)
Admission : Adult ¥1200 / University and High school students ¥800 / Junior High School Students and below

FLYER
LIST

Cats All Over – Life in Edo with Cats

Among the various animals that appear in ukiyo-e, cats were the most popular subject. They were not only depicted as pets but also as monsters or personified, dancing and attending schools. Chronicles of a life of a female cat and amulets as mice repellent were produced as well. This exhibition will present various works of cats, including masterpieces by Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Utagawa Hiroshige and Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, as well as “Omocha-e” (toy paintings) for children. Please enjoy the charming cats in ukiyo-e; thay are adorable, humorous, and sometimes mysterious.

Utagawa Kuniyoshi “Fashionable Cats Juggling Balls”

Utagawa Hiroshige “One Hundred Famous Views of Edo: Asakusa Ricefields and Torinomachi Festival”
Utagawa Kuniyoshi “Famous Products of the Provinces with Women’s Postures: Looking Painful”
Utagawa Yoshifuji “Small Kittens Join to Form a Big Cat”

Best Cats Exhibition Ever? – Kuniyoshi’s Masterpieces Gather Here

Utagawa Kuniyoshi depicted many charming cats in ukiyo-e. During the first term, all 5 works in the series “Cats forming characters” that are particularly popular among Kuniyoshi’s works will be on display. The second term will present the valuable masterpieces “Sonomama Juguchi Myokaiko Gojusannbiki” (fifty-three cats personified as the post-towns between Tokyo and Kyoto) and “Tatoe-zukushi No Uchi” (personified cat idioms) together. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to see Kuniyoshi’s masterpieces gathered in this exhibition.

Utagawa Kuniyoshi “Cats Suggested as the Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō Road”
Utagawa Kuniyoshi “Cats Forming the Hiragana Characters for Bonito”
Utagawa Kuniyoshi “Printed Cat to Keep Mice Away”

Enjoy the Cat Stories

Manga featuring cats are popular today, but even during the Edo period, stories, novels, and kabuki with cats were extremely popular. You will see pictures of monster cats, old cats that behold the secret of martial arts and stories including that of “Okoma” and “Otama,” who lead chaotic lives as cats, avenging their mother’s death and seizing their position to serve for the palace. Please enjoy the cat stories that were endeared by Edo people.

Utagawa Kuniyoshi “Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō Road: Okazaki”

Cats in trend – multi-media art attempted by Kuniyoshi

In 1841, Kuniyoshi produced a round fan picture “Neko-no Hyakumenso” (the many faces of cats) depicting cats as actual kabuki actor’s faces. When it became popular, a kabuki play that featured these fan pictures was performed. Around this time, Kuniyoshi also produced pictures of acrobatic performers personified as cats and illustrations for the novel “Oborozuki Neko No Soushi” (Story of the Hazy Moon Cat). This exhibition takes you back to the time when ukiyo-e of cats where in their highest popularity, by featuring many works produced in 1841 and 1842, when Kuniyoshi concentrated on producing personified pictures of cats.

Utagawa Kuniyoshi “One-hundred Faces of Cats”
Utagawa Kuniyoshi “Illustrated Book “Oborozuki Neko no Sōshi”

Playing with Cats – World of Toy Pictures

“Omocha-e” (toy pictures) is ukiyo-e for children, largely produced from the end of the Edo period to the Meiji era. Most of them depict a world inhabited solely by cats, and we can tell that cats were also adored by children. Cats in the public bath, eating soba noodles and going out on a rickshaw ride – about 40 toy pictures will be on display in this exhibition. Why don’t we play with them and enjoy their adorable world together?

Utagawa Yoshifuji “Hotspring Spa for Cats”
Artist Unknown “Big Catfish and Comical Cats”
Admission
Adult 1200 yen
University and High school students 800 yen
Junior High School Students and below Free
Calendar

Closed

2023 04

休館日

3,10,17,24,26-28

2023 / 04

3,10,17,24,26-28

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
2023 05

休館日

1,8,15,22,29-31

2023 / 05

1,8,15,22,29-31

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

Hiroshige’s Ojisan Encyclopedia

2023, February 3rd-March 26th

1st Term February 3rd-26th
2nd Term March 3rd-26th

Will be closed on February 6, 13, 20, 27- March 2, 6, 13, 20.

Opening Hours : 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Last Admission: 5:00 p.m.)
Admission : Adult ¥800 / University and High school students ¥600 / Junior High School Students and below

FLYER
LIST

Smiling, Working and Traveling -Various Ojisan by Utagawa Hiroshige

Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858) is one of the most famous ukiyo-e artists who created many masterpieces of landscapes. When you look closely, you often find charming figures inhabiting these landscapes. These middle-aged men (“Ojisan” in Japanese) are the focus of this exhibition. They smile innocently, work hard, enjoy fine foods, and sometimes panic. The more attention you pay to Hiroshige’s Ojisan, the more you realize that they have their own personalities and charms.

By experiencing Hiroshige’s masterpieces paying close attention to these Ojisan, they will leave you a fresh impression. This exhibition introduces you to a new charm of Hiroshige’s work through masterpieces such as “Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō Road (Hoeidō Edition)” to those that are rarely exhibited.

※This exhibition is inspired by the concept of “Ojisan Encyclopedia” and “Ojisan Encyclopedia Returns” held at Hiroshige Museum of Art Ena, newly composed with the collections of Ota Memorial Museum of Art.

Utagawa Hiroshige “Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō Road: Goyu” (1st term)
Utagawa Hiroshige “Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō Road: Mariko” (1st term)

1 Discovering a new Charm of Hiroshige’ work through Ojisan

In the works of Utagawa Hiroshige, various Ojisan (middle-aged men) with their own personality often appear. They are usually depicted as supporting characters of the landscape. However, if you look closely, you can see that their faces, expressions, and clothing are carefully articulated. Such detail allows us to understand their status and occupation, and sometimes even imagine the drama that each character is going through. As you pay attention to these Ojisan, you will enjoy the masterpieces you already know with more depth and color.

Utagawa Hiroshige “Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō Road: Yokkaichi, Mie River” (2nd term)
Utagawa Hiroshige “Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō Road: Morning Mist at Mishima” (2nd term)

2 Ojisan everywhere! 150 Works from Masterpieces to Rarities by Hiroshige

The main characters in the 150 works on display during the period of this exhibition are all Ojisan. The exhibition introduces of Hiroshige’s masterpieces such as “Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō Road (Hoeidō Edition)” and “Sixty-nine Stations of Kisokaidō Road,” as well as works that are rarely exhibited, all united under the theme of Ojisan!

Utagawa Hiroshige “Sixty-nine Stations of the Kisokaidō Road: 19, Karuizawa” (1st term)
Utagawa Hiroshige “Thirty-six Views of Mt. Fuji: Suruga-chō in Edo” (2nd term)
Utagawa Hiroshige “Comical Shadow Pictures: Rabbit / Adnis” (1st term)

3 Hokusai, Kuniyoshi and Kiyochika -Ojisan Depicted by Popular Ukiyo-e Artists

Hiroshige was not the only artist who depicted various Ojisan. In this exhibition, we introduce Ojisan drawn by various ukiyo-e masters, such as Katsushika Hokusai, Keisai Eisen, Utagawa Kuniyoshi and Kobayashi Kiyochika. Please enjoy the differences in style and personality given to the Ojisan by each artist.

Katsushika Hokusai “Picture Book “Hokusai Manga” Volume 10” (1st term)
Kobayashi Kiyochika “Making Comic Faces” (2nd term)

Admission
Adult 800 yen
University and High school students 600 yen
Junior High School Students and below Free
Calendar

Closed

2023 2

休館日

1,2,6,13,20,27,28

2023 / 2

1,2,6,13,20,27,28

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
2023 3

休館日

1,2,6,13,20,27-31

2023 / 3

1,2,6,13,20,27-31

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

China in Ukiyo-e

2023, January 5th-29th

Will be closed on 10, 16, 23.

Opening Hours : 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Last Admission: 5:00 p.m.)
Admission : Adult ¥800 / University and High school students ¥600 / Junior High School Students and below

FLYER
LIST

Discovering the Unexpected Relationship between Ukiyo-e and Chinese Culture

Ukiyo-e depicted a large number of Chinese people, including the heroes of “Three Kingdoms” and “Water Margin,” hermits, and ancient Chinese women. In addition, some of the Japanese flower-and-bird paintings are accompanied by Chinese poems, which shows how familiar the people of the Edo period were with Chinese culture. On the other hand, works that replaced the hermits with women or parodied the exploits of the great masters were also popular.

During the Edo period, Japan was closed to the outside world for a long period of time, but classical Chinese literature and folklore were well-established in education, and people were curious about the latest Chinese culture. Ukiyo-e artists also worked on all kinds of themes from China, and even created many other works based on them.

This exhibition introduces ukiyo-e from the Edo and Meiji periods that show the influence of Chinese culture in three parts. In the first part, we will look at works from the 18th century, when samurai warriors were also involved in the production of ukiyo-e. The second part will focus on works in the 19th century, which reflect the tastes of citizens, and in the third part, works depicted in the form of parodies will be featured. Throughout the exhibition, visitors will be able to discover the unexpected connections between ukiyo-e and China.

Suzuki Harunobu “Parody of a Verse of Chinese Poems: Burning Maple Leaves to Heat Sake”
Tsukioka Yoshitoshi “One Hundred Views of the Moon: Beautiful Woman Comes under the Trees in the Moonlight”
Tsukioka Yoshitoshi “One Hundred Views of the Moon: Jade Rabbit and Sun Wukong”」

“Three Kingdoms” and “Water Margin” Boom Began from the Edo Period.

Even today, the Chinese stories “Three Kingdoms” and “Water Margin” are popular in video games and manga, but it was actually in the Edo period that these stories were translated and adapted.

The stories were also depicted in ukiyo-e. Especially, Utagawa Kuniyoshi played an important role in expanding the world of these stories. He created the popular series “One Hundred and Eight Heroes from the Water Margin” with 74 prints, and the series “Popular History of the Three Kingdoms” series which depicts heroes on large paper.

Utagawa Kuniyoshi “The Records of the Three Kingdoms: Guan Yu Defeats Five Barrier Points”

A Great Arrangement in Ukiyo-e Style – Heroes Swapped Gender!?

Rearranging various subjects is one of the characteristics of ukiyo-e. For example, the figures of heroes were sometimes depicted as humorous caricatures, or sometimes in the figures of townswomen, so that people enjoy the gap between the hero and the character. These works of parody show how people of the time were familiar with Chinese themes.

Utagawa Kunisada “Parody of Three Kingdoms: Chinese General Liu Bei Visiting a Sage Zhuge Liang in the Snow”

“China” Depicted by Hokusai, Hiroshige and Kuniyoshi

Many works by leading ukiyo-e artists of each era will also be introduced. These include Harunobu, who transferred Chinese subjects into Japanese scenes; Hokusai, who painted all kinds of subjects of Chinese origin; Kuniyoshi, who represented the heroes from “Water Margin” as characters popular with the Edo people; Hiroshige, who added Chinese poetry to his “kachō-ga (bird-and-flower pictures); and Yoshitoshi, who drew classical Chinese subjects in the Meiji era. We hope that you will enjoy the transition in the way Chinese culture was incorporated in each of works.

Katsushika Hokusai “Famous Places in China”
Utagawa Hiroshige “Loquats and a Bird”
Utagawa Kuniyoshi “One Hundred and Eight Heroes of the Water Margin: Zhang Shun”
Tamura Sadanobu “Perspective Picture: Chinese Room”
Admission
Adult 800 yen
University and High school students600 yen
Junior High School Students and below Free
Calendar

closed

2023 1

休館日

1-4,10,16,23,30,31

2023 / 1

1-4,10,16,23,30,31

SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT